thebeatlesordie:

The Bealtes and an unknown man. 

thebeatlesordie:

The Bealtes and an unknown man. 

predecessors:

A Nazi Nuremberg rally in the Cathedral of Light, a feature designed by Albert Speer consisting of 130 anti-aircraft searchlights that surrounded the audience with pillars of light pointing skyward. 1937.

predecessors:

A Nazi Nuremberg rally in the Cathedral of Light, a feature designed by Albert Speer consisting of 130 anti-aircraft searchlights that surrounded the audience with pillars of light pointing skyward. 1937.

(via rivieree)

The countries of Europe (inspired by x)

(via year-of-violentdreams)

thealishadimension:

thesecarryingarms:

bellabitchh:

Phil, this wasn’t fucking amateur hour. PEOPLE DIED BECAUSE OF YOUR LACK OF SUPERVISION. THERE WERE RAPTORS ALL UP IN THE KITCHEN PHIL. IN THE GOD DAMN KITCHEN.
YOU HAD ONE JOB PHIL. ONE JOB.

I will never not reblog this.

thealishadimension:

thesecarryingarms:

bellabitchh:

Phil, this wasn’t fucking amateur hour. PEOPLE DIED BECAUSE OF YOUR LACK OF SUPERVISION. THERE WERE RAPTORS ALL UP IN THE KITCHEN PHIL. IN THE GOD DAMN KITCHEN.

YOU HAD ONE JOB PHIL. ONE JOB.

I will never not reblog this.

(via iamthegirlbehindthereddoor)

an-art-gallery:

Number 5, 1948
Jackson Pollock
Jackson Pollock’s paintings are no strangers to high prices at auction, and his Number 5 is no different. In November of 2006, Number 5, painted in Pollock’s unique drip technique, was sold for $140 million dollars, the highest price ever paid at auction for a painting, to an unknown buyer. This price exceeded both the high price paid for his Blue Poles, which sold in 1973, as well as Gustav Klimt’s Portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer I, which previously held the high price record. Using his entire body to paint in a method called “action painting,” Pollock dripped and splattered layer upon layer of paint to create his chaotic patterns.

an-art-gallery:

Number 5, 1948

Jackson Pollock

Jackson Pollock’s paintings are no strangers to high prices at auction, and his Number 5 is no different. In November of 2006, Number 5, painted in Pollock’s unique drip technique, was sold for $140 million dollars, the highest price ever paid at auction for a painting, to an unknown buyer. This price exceeded both the high price paid for his Blue Poles, which sold in 1973, as well as Gustav Klimt’s Portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer I, which previously held the high price record. Using his entire body to paint in a method called “action painting,” Pollock dripped and splattered layer upon layer of paint to create his chaotic patterns.